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Dengue scare adds to India's Commonwealth Games woes

posted 2 Sep 2010, 05:24 by Mpelembe Admin   [ updated 2 Sep 2010, 05:30 ]

With over 1,000 suspected dengue cases being reported in the Indian capital, the outbreak of the disease adds to the woes of the Commonwealth Games organisers, already struggling with construction delays and fighting corruption charges.

NEW DELHI, INDIA (SEPTEMBER 02, 2010) ANI - With over 1,000 suspected dengue cases being reported in the Indian capital, the outbreak of the disease has added to the woes of the Commonwealth Games organisers, already struggling with construction delays and fighting corruption charges.

Local media has reported that at least 20 participating countries have written to the Commonwealth Games Organising Committee inquiring about the measures being taken to control the outbreak of the disease in and around the Commonwealth Games venues.

A combination of heavy rains that has lashed the city this year and the debris created due to the ongoing construction for the upcoming Games has become a fertile breeding ground for mosquitoes and water-borne diseases.

Indian dailies have been highlighting the danger with pictures of stagnant water at the Games village, where the athletes and administrators would be staying, as well as around some of the main stadiums where work has still not finished.

Dengue is transmitted by the bite of an Aedes mosquito infected with any one of the four-dengue viruses. It occurs in tropical and sub-tropical regions, making India a perfect recipe for disaster and recently the country's health minister had blamed the unfinished work related to the games for the outbreak of the disease.

With just about three weeks to go before athletes start arriving from the participating countries for the 2010 games that are scheduled to begin on 3rd October, a veterinary team has been assigned the job of removing the rodents from the games venues by mid-September.

On Thursday, India's junior health minister Dinesh Trivedi blamed the provincial government for the current mess.

"If you have bad road conditions, if no body bothers about stagnate water, then there is going to be a breeding ground, it is a simple thing," said Trivedi.

Workers at various construction sites can be seen working in deplorable conditions with debris and garbage floating around them. These conditions and the labourers might become unwilling carriers for the disease.

Meanwhile, the local authorities have been putting up a brave front, saying they have doubled the number of fogging machines and were also putting other measures in place to prevent the spread of water-born diseases.

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